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"Ideas are easy, execution is hard."

Co-Founder of HigherLevels.com

Kristoffer Hari

Hi, my name is Kris Hari and I'd like to tell you a little about how I went from playing video games and skipping classes to consulting for corporate companies, and eventually owning my own multi million dollar venture.

I was born and raised in a small town right outside of Copenhagen, Denmark, called Taastrup. Arguably no one from this city ever really achieved "true success". However, I was determined to be the outlier.

I have always considered myself as a little different from my peers. My parents used the word "mature for his age", and meanwhile there might be an extent of truth to that, I believe that is a vain explanation. It didn’t matter if it was in the International school I went to when I was young, or when I took classes at Harvard. Olympic Qualifier at 21, or even when I became the fastest track athlete ever to be born in Denmark, I was always trying to push past the limits of my potential. I always knew what I wanted, I just needed the right strategy to get there.

Feeling alone at the time of my younger days (even though I am practically still a baby), I forced myself to actively search for a more mature crowd. I found that crowd online – through video games. My time playing video games eventually led me to develop essential critical thinking skills and promoted an extremely competitive mindset as I was getting into competitive gaming at the age of 13. 

As my online team-mates were American, my english skills alongside my technical skills online developed immensely. I was skipping high school classes to play video games– something that might have seemed counterproductive at the time to my parents, but has helped me become the person that I am today. If it wasn’t for the people I had met online at the time, I wouldn’t have been the person that I am today. 

As I became more and more invested in the online world, I eventually found ways to make money online through my new qualifications. Starting off with offering my services to help other people climb ranks in the video game I was playing at the time (Yes, it is rather ridiculous – But a rather profitable market) all the way to creating websites and coding.

Concurrently, being around my peers became dreadful. I was constantly battling the notion of why I was progressing further along than them — Did I just get lucky? Were the odds in my favor? Then it hit me. I had subconsciously switched up my environment, which made all of those choices so simple for me. The people I was playing video games with were mid-20’s and had a lot more life experience than the peers around me on the playground in recession. Skipping classes actually removed me from the negative and childish environment that I found myself in roughly 70% of every single day. When I spent more time with people that were more mature, it became natural for me to just force myself to become a “grown-up” faster. 

Over time, I become one of the top players at the time, and I was winning prize money and playing for the #1 team in the world, selected to play in the world championships. However, naturally, as time went by... I outgrew my environment yet again. I wanted more. I wasn't content with just playing video games all day long. What value was I bringing to the world? What was I leaving behind? I knew I needed more. It was an everlasting urge to become more than I already was.

However, the path to success wasn't exactly perfect... When I started out my track & field career alongside college, I was forced to let go of the online hustling. I remember that a $1,000 month was fantastic for me, which isn't bad when you do Track & Field in Copenhagen. It was fine because I was living under the roof of my parents, and it allowed me to do what I loved, in pursuit of perhaps becoming significant enough to land a big enough contract.

After a year of committing my entire life to Track & Field, I became the fastest runner in the world under the age of 18, at the age of 15. I had broken two European records, and equalling one world record. I remember the feeling of crossing the finish line and realizing that I had done something extraordinary. Something that others weren't able to, even with life-long training behind them. I had made it big. I thought.

I was offered a $40,000 contract with PUMA. I had busted my ass off for $10,000 a year. The highest possible achievement in the sport at my respective age, and that was all of it. Meanwhile that was an upgrade, it wasn't near what I expected to get out of all of that hard work.
Anyway, I continue doing Track & Field, breaking record after record with barely any upwards financial mobility. I realized that I must shift part of my efforts towards life after Track & Field. During this time, I start to learn and read books on web design, web development, online marketing and search engine optimization. After a brief period of scattered learning, I decide to pick up software development decisively. 

I was a slow starter. I cared little for school initially, finishing off middle school with subpar grades, making it into one of the top gymnasiums in Copenhagen based solely on my athletic efforts. However, with my recent anti-climatic athletic career let-down. This became a turnaround time for me. 

I started studying and making straight A’s, finding a new burning desire within the field of educational knowledge. Upon graduating high-school, I had become a vivid learner in the pursuit of the knowledge that was going to take me above and beyond my goals in life. I pursued Mathematics, International Business, and Software Development. All in vain. Nothing felt sufficient enough to get me to where I wanted to be. 

I figured what better place to study than the pinnacle of education? Ivy League – Harvard; CS50.
As I'm getting a proper introduction to Harvard's Computer Science Program (CS50), I find myself doubting my life choices yet again. I was no longer focusing my full efforts towards Track & Field, which became quite an obvious reflection from how I was performing. 

Three years had gone by and I wasn't moving forward. I was stuck. I had to make a decision about my future and what I was going to bet on. I wasn't about to let my talent go to waste, so I decided I'd continue to pursue Track & Field with a full scholarship with the most winning Track & Field team in the NCAA. 

Then, something extremely coincidental happened.
Cryptocurrencies became a thing. 

Back in 2013, when I was still playing video games and messing around, Bitcoin was a legitimate currency amongst gamers but was not adopted by the public yet. Back when I used Bitcoin, it was valued around $30. Fast forward 4 years and myself forgetting all about it, it was now valued at $20,000. As things started taking off exponentially, I saw an opportunity for upwards mobility.

With the Bitcoin I had left from back in the day, I had more than enough to fuel my learning curve. I started educating myself on block-chain technology, tokens, and all that came with it. As time went on, more and more people became curious, and as my friends had seen me analyzing candlesticks (charts), they naturally suggested me to their friends for financial advice (I do not recommend this).

I started getting countless messages on my phone, Facebook, Instagram, you name it. Everybody was looking to "ride the wave" and become rich. Things eventually became so hectic that I ended up creating a Facebook group where I would share signals and advice to friends whenever I found out something new. 
I called the group "CRYPTO" and it was and still is extremely popular in the higher-society of Copenhagen (still active to this very day). 

Lawyers, Doctors, Rocket scientists (yes, literally), Financial Advisors, Designers, CMOs, Entrepreneurs, and many more started joining at a rapid rate. 

Everyone wanted in. 

As people started seeing results based around my signals, I knew my advice was valuable. I figured it was about time I monetized. I created a new mastermind group which was a crypto-coaching group with an opt-in price of $1,000. Very quickly that group grew beyond 50+ members.

This was the first time my advice had been so highly sought after. As my position as an educator grew, I eventually ended up making a 33-page guide with more than a thousand hours worth of educational material that I'd give to my students. 
As crypto-currencies became widely adopted, more and more clueless people joined in. People were losing money left and right and technical analyses could no longer be applied to anything. It was all just a guessing game at this point. 

Meanwhile I became very passionate about the technology behind tokens, I realized that it was no longer a sustainable service that I could sell to my students. I was unable to provide correct signals as the markets had been flooded with people abusing the unregulated aspects of crypto-currencies. People were now using crypto to buy drugs, evade taxes, pump and liquidate own assets... It spiraled out of control. My main students became frustrated 35-year olds who just wanted to get rich quick, not willing to learn any of the material I had prepared for them. 

I swing-traded until I had assets enough to exit, and I left the market. I knew I didn't want to trade cryptocurrencies for the rest of my life, and I figured... If I could sell my advice so successfully through cryptocurrencies, surely I must be able to sell other advice online?

From here on out, I tried to learn Fundamental Business strategies, enrolling in Business Management at the University of Arkansas to pursue Track & Field concurrently on the side. Economics, Marketing, Accounting, Finance, you name it...
One day, I found myself in an economics class, in which an innocent student whipped out her laptop in class, and in that exact same moment the professor swiftly told her to leave the class furiously, as he had a strict no-electronics policy during his classes. The professor was clearly frustrated. 

So, I asked myself... This human being, with a PhD... All of those years in the educational field... He was obviously so unhappy. All of these entitled professors, unwilling to respond to emails unless you prompt them with "Dr." before hand. Why? Were they really more entitled than the rest of us? What was so special about this guy? 

I'd propose the opposite actually. Taking the standard educational route is the easy path. It's the path that everyone embarks upon because of what their parents have told them. It's available to everyone. It's the safe bet. Everyone receives the same education; the same outdated information that will get everyone the exact same jobs. And we wonder why it's so hard to find a job in the modern day? 

I had just read a book that outlined the average salary of a professor... That number was roughly $73,500. I remember thinking to myself: "So I'm listening to a professor teaching me methodological supply and demand, but yet is only able to reap in $73,500 a year. Surely this wasn't his highest aspiration in life. He always came to class frustrated and unhappy..." 

The problem is that parents always feel a sense of pride when they're able to tell their social circle of Karen and John that their child is now a certified pediatrician with 2 MBAs, 1 PhD, $200,000 in student debt, and 11 years of studying put behind them. On the contrary, they'd hate to tell everyone that their son just dropped out of school in pursuit of "his dreams". Sure, there's plenty of people that have put that reputation to waste. However, for those that know what they want, that is the ONLY route. I had to learn the hard way... By not following your dreams, you end up just delaying or forgetting. There comes a time when you simply cannot juggle between the two anymore. 

It hit me pretty hard when I realized that the resulting of his teaching would allow me to make less than that. All this time in college, only to enter an entry level job to net in an average of $50,000 after 4 years of hard work. And that wasn't just myself, but all 350 students in that lecture hall. We were all just a reflection of what our professors were teaching, and if they could only get themselves up to a mere $73,500 a year doing something that they clearly didn't love, then where would that put me?

Now, I'm not saying that you shouldn't pursue your dreams if you want to be a professor – I'm saying that there is a profitable way to achieve your dreams, and then there is one that gets you into hundreds of thousands of student debt and stress. After all, the most aspired presentations at Ivy League universities are, ironically, by people with no degrees.

It just stopped making sense to me. Sure, I had a full scholarship with everything paid for... But I was actually losing money by not being able to scale my own offer. Surely this wasn't the framework that I was looking for. I loved teaching others myself, but I refused to put myself in the position of any given classical PhD professor. I refused to go through years and years of education, only to be rewarded with a bunch of non-caring students and an average salary.

I already had a decent amount of money saved up from my crypto-currency venture, but I wanted to do more. I wanted to do something that actually had meaning and could switch my position from a stale financial standing point, to an upwards trajectory.

So, I quit doing stimuli drugs to stay ahead in my classes and started investing in personal development and business fundamentals, all the way until I had eventually dried up my assets. I quit studying and did the bare minimum to stay eligible for my scholarship. Everyone around me were quite surprised to say the least. Ever since I started college, I had been a straight A student. I would go above and beyond to not just get 90's, but 100's. It was a turnaround, for sure.

Coaches and peers around me would ask me if everything was alright and were worried beyond measure, but to their defense, I would probably have been too. A straight-A student suddenly dropping down to all C's? They thought that I had given up on everything in life, lol. 

The next thing were the people around me – I naturally started distancing myself apart from them as I grew out of my bad habits. I stopped partying, going out for no reason, attending get-togethers... all in the pursuit of upwards mobility. Yes, I was by myself, but it felt really damn good knowing that I was well on my way towards my goals. I knew that in order for that to happen, I had to get rid of my negative traits. 

With my pre-existing coding skills (which I didn't learn in college), I embarked out to consult and create solutions for different companies throughout my time in higher education. Throughout this period of time, I learned to recognize the eco-system(s) behind successful organizations. Not long after, I started consulting IT departments, manage projects, web-design management, SEO, and coaching.

The art of conducting business had become tangible. It was no longer just mere speculation, it was reiterating and providing a proven framework over and over again for success. It worked. Again and again.

The problem then became that I was doing and advising the same things over and over. I was stuck in a position where I couldn't allow myself to take on more clients, and if there's one thing engineers learn – It's never to repeat themselves. 

Naturally, I tried to find a solution, but in vain. My potential was capped at taking x clients on and I was unable to move from that point.

Until I stumbled upon an amazing new business model – Online Courses.

This model was proposed to me by two good friends of mine (one of which is Stephen, my partner.) I partnered up with them to explore and learn more about the industry, meanwhile scaling an offer to new heights.

As things were escalating, I realized that the nature of the offer that I had stepped into had a Done-For-You vibe to it. This means that students were utterly reliant on us. If we decided to quit from one day to the other, their investment would have been in vain. The infopreneurship aspect that I had fallen in love with wasn't there anymore. The environment shifted over towards having to do everything for the students. 

Meanwhile I don't mind being the reason why other people make money, I want them to do it on their own. I want to create vivid entrepreneurs that can crush reality as it is perceived, not people who have to tag along every single step of the way.

I wanted to teach people how I did it. I wanted to teach others that with a proven process, you can achieve any of your goals. Anyone can gain the financial and time freedom that they've been looking for. Anyone can build something amazing AS LONG as they have a proven framework to put the work into and they stay diligent towards success.

It was at this point in time that I got extremely clear on my ideal client. I wanted to work with motivated/aspiring entrepreneurs. Entrepreneurs that were just like myself, unwilling to give up. I wanted to give them a framework that they could tap into to achieve their dreams. A framework that I, myself, had been looking for, for oh so long.

As my time in the digital world fostered, I became a lot more aware of my surroundings and in what ways the world was headed to. My external world changed immensely as well. 

A byproduct of my new productive habits and focus allowed me to become a 4x All-American and to qualify for the Olympics in Tokyo. The only danish athlete ever to do so in my respective event since the beginning of time.
My college experience was short lived. Not in the sense of physically attending college, but in the sense of not knowing what I wanted to do. Learning blindly without a higher purpose.

To perhaps put things in contrast even further, I've decided to include my story of how a recruiter at Google changed my life furthermore:

After my sophomore year, I had an internship lined up with Google in San Francisco. I was extremely pumped to get to go and to experience more of the corporate world. Being active on computer science hubs, I realized that a lot of the stuff that I was learning was actually pure methodology and not practical for application. I looked up the semester plans and quickly came to the realization that every single thing that was essential to my career in Computer Science wasn’t gonna happen for another 3 years. I thought I was ultimately going to have to bullshit my time at Google, pretending to know stuff. 

My two and a half years in College had given me absolutely nothing that I could show to an employer to appeal to them other than grades.

I wasn’t going to just sit around and learn non-applicational knowledge for 3 years, especially when competitive firms such as Google and Facebook had just announced that they actually prefer self-taught talent. I was so curious as to why these companies preferred self-taught people rather than ones that had gone through the traditional system, proving their worth. 

Now, my internship presented me with the opportunity to speak to a recruiting representative early on. I asked him what the reasoning behind their recruiting policy was–

Here’s the summarized answer that I received:

“Here at Google, we prefer people that are driven to learn and solve problems. We don’t care if you went to college, we care what skills and capabilities you have. If you can prove to us that you're a valuable asset, we will take you in openly.”

I was confused… Extremely confused… But then again, it actually made a lot of sense and helped prove my theory.

You see, anybody can emit to a college and do well with guided problems, tutors and professors. However, when you see a problem in your mind, and you solve it on your own by teaching yourself a new skill (i.e. coding), it demonstrates the diligent mindset that cutting-edge employers are actively looking for.

“If given the choice between two people with the same skill-set, however differing through the level of traditional scholar education… We would pick the one with the least amount of scholar education. The person who seeked out knowledge to solve a problem on his own, and managed to teach himself, is deemed a much more innovative part of the team than someone who simply follows orders from others. We are looking for people with drive!”

Very quickly, I realized that my degree was worth nothing apart from a visual indicator of how well I was able to balance my workload. Despite the contrary belief of what others tell you all the time, that is the truth. Here you have it, straight from one of the biggest corporations in the world.

I realized that college was just a notion of teaching people how to juggle multiple things at once. It taught you time management – your grades alongside extra curricular activities were an accurate representation of how well you did that. 

Employers didn’t care about your 4.0 if all you did was sit in a basement doing homework 18 hours a day, doped on Adderall. Anybody can do that. 

The notion of being the best you possibly can be– Society’s notion that Harvard was the utmost elite environment you could find yourself in had let me down tremendously. And one thing was for certain, I wasn’t about to waste 3 years of my life before learning about something that could get me an entry level position to pay off for the wasted time.

The key thing to take out of my story, if you've read this far (I applause you), is that there was a pattern to my breakthrough success. A pattern that I now actively teach others to abide by, in order to help them to go from not knowing what they want to do at all, to finding their true calling and enjoy waking up every single day.

Step outside of your comfort zone, allow yourself to transcend into an optimized version of yourself. Start today by surrounding yourself with people that will make you rise to the occasion. 

What me and Stephen have created for you all is a result of two highly motivated entrepreneurs combining the best of both worlds into one sustainable way of achieving success in life. It has taken us years of hard work to figure out what works and what doesn't, so that you won't have to.

Thanks for reading my story, I wish you all the best on your journey towards success.

- Kris
Co-Founder of HigherLevels.com

Kristoffer Hari

Hi, my name is Kris Hari and I'd like to tell you a little about how I went from playing video games and skipping classes to consulting for corporate companies, and eventually owning my own multi million dollar venture.

I was born and raised in a small town right outside of Copenhagen, Denmark, called Taastrup. Arguably no one from this city ever really achieved "true success". However, I was determined to be the outlier.

I have always considered myself as a little different from my peers. My parents used the word "mature for his age", and meanwhile there might be an extent of truth to that, I believe that is a vain explanation. It didn’t matter if it was in the International school I went to when I was young, or when I took classes at Harvard. Olympic Qualifier at 21, or even when I became the fastest track athlete ever to be born in Denmark, I was always trying to push past the limits of my potential. I always knew what I wanted, I just needed the right strategy to get there.

Feeling alone at the time of my younger days (even though I am practically still a baby), I forced myself to actively search for a more mature crowd. I found that crowd online – through video games. My time playing video games eventually led me to develop essential critical thinking skills and promoted an extremely competitive mindset as I was getting into competitive gaming at the age of 13. 

As my online team-mates were American, my english skills alongside my technical skills online developed immensely. I was skipping high school classes to play video games– something that might have seemed counterproductive at the time to my parents, but has helped me become the person that I am today. If it wasn’t for the people I had met online at the time, I wouldn’t have been the person that I am today. 

As I became more and more invested in the online world, I eventually found ways to make money online through my new qualifications. Starting off with offering my services to help other people climb ranks in the video game I was playing at the time (Yes, it is rather ridiculous – But a rather profitable market) all the way to creating websites and coding.

Concurrently, being around my peers became dreadful. I was constantly battling the notion of why I was progressing further along than them — Did I just get lucky? Were the odds in my favor? Then it hit me. I had subconsciously switched up my environment, which made all of those choices so simple for me. The people I was playing video games with were mid-20’s and had a lot more life experience than the peers around me on the playground in recession. Skipping classes actually removed me from the negative and childish environment that I found myself in roughly 70% of every single day. When I spent more time with people that were more mature, it became natural for me to just force myself to become a “grown-up” faster. 

Over time, I become one of the top players at the time, and I was winning prize money and playing for the #1 team in the world, selected to play in the world championships. However, naturally, as time went by... I outgrew my environment yet again. I wanted more. I wasn't content with just playing video games all day long. What value was I bringing to the world? What was I leaving behind? I knew I needed more. It was an everlasting urge to become more than I already was.

However, the path to success wasn't exactly perfect... When I started out my track & field career alongside college, I was forced to let go of the online hustling. I remember that a $1,000 month was fantastic for me, which isn't bad when you do Track & Field in Copenhagen. It was fine because I was living under the roof of my parents, and it allowed me to do what I loved, in pursuit of perhaps becoming significant enough to land a big enough contract.

After a year of committing my entire life to Track & Field, I became the fastest runner in the world under the age of 18, at the age of 15. I had broken two European records, and equalling one world record. I remember the feeling of crossing the finish line and realizing that I had done something extraordinary. Something that others weren't able to, even with life-long training behind them. I had made it big. I thought.

I was offered a $40,000 contract with PUMA. I had busted my ass off for $10,000 a year. The highest possible achievement in the sport at my respective age, and that was all of it. Meanwhile that was an upgrade, it wasn't near what I expected to get out of all of that hard work.
Anyway, I continue doing Track & Field, breaking record after record with barely any upwards financial mobility. I realized that I must shift part of my efforts towards life after Track & Field. During this time, I start to learn and read books on web design, web development, online marketing and search engine optimization. After a brief period of scattered learning, I decide to pick up software development decisively. 

I was a slow starter. I cared little for school initially, finishing off middle school with subpar grades, making it into one of the top gymnasiums in Copenhagen based solely on my athletic efforts. However, with my recent anti-climatic athletic career let-down. This became a turnaround time for me. 

I started studying and making straight A’s, finding a new burning desire within the field of educational knowledge. Upon graduating high-school, I had become a vivid learner in the pursuit of the knowledge that was going to take me above and beyond my goals in life. I pursued Mathematics, International Business, and Software Development. All in vain. Nothing felt sufficient enough to get me to where I wanted to be. 

I figured what better place to study than the pinnacle of education? Ivy League – Harvard; CS50.
As I'm getting a proper introduction to Harvard's Computer Science Program (CS50), I find myself doubting my life choices yet again. I was no longer focusing my full efforts towards Track & Field, which became quite an obvious reflection from how I was performing. 

Three years had gone by and I wasn't moving forward. I was stuck. I had to make a decision about my future and what I was going to bet on. I wasn't about to let my talent go to waste, so I decided I'd continue to pursue Track & Field with a full scholarship with the most winning Track & Field team in the NCAA. 

Then, something extremely coincidental happened.
Cryptocurrencies became a thing. 

Back in 2013, when I was still playing video games and messing around, Bitcoin was a legitimate currency amongst gamers but was not adopted by the public yet. Back when I used Bitcoin, it was valued around $30. Fast forward 4 years and myself forgetting all about it, it was now valued at $20,000. As things started taking off exponentially, I saw an opportunity for upwards mobility.

With the Bitcoin I had left from back in the day, I had more than enough to fuel my learning curve. I started educating myself on block-chain technology, tokens, and all that came with it. As time went on, more and more people became curious, and as my friends had seen me analyzing candlesticks (charts), they naturally suggested me to their friends for financial advice (I do not recommend this).

I started getting countless messages on my phone, Facebook, Instagram, you name it. Everybody was looking to "ride the wave" and become rich. Things eventually became so hectic that I ended up creating a Facebook group where I would share signals and advice to friends whenever I found out something new. 
I called the group "CRYPTO" and it was and still is extremely popular in the higher-society of Copenhagen (still active to this very day). 

Lawyers, Doctors, Rocket scientists (yes, literally), Financial Advisors, Designers, CMOs, Entrepreneurs, and many more started joining at a rapid rate. 

Everyone wanted in. 

As people started seeing results based around my signals, I knew my advice was valuable. I figured it was about time I monetized. I created a new mastermind group which was a crypto-coaching group with an opt-in price of $1,000. Very quickly that group grew beyond 50+ members.

This was the first time my advice had been so highly sought after. As my position as an educator grew, I eventually ended up making a 33-page guide with more than a thousand hours worth of educational material that I'd give to my students. 
As crypto-currencies became widely adopted, more and more clueless people joined in. People were losing money left and right and technical analyses could no longer be applied to anything. It was all just a guessing game at this point. 

Meanwhile I became very passionate about the technology behind tokens, I realized that it was no longer a sustainable service that I could sell to my students. I was unable to provide correct signals as the markets had been flooded with people abusing the unregulated aspects of crypto-currencies. People were now using crypto to buy drugs, evade taxes, pump and liquidate own assets... It spiraled out of control. My main students became frustrated 35-year olds who just wanted to get rich quick, not willing to learn any of the material I had prepared for them. 

I swing-traded until I had assets enough to exit, and I left the market. I knew I didn't want to trade cryptocurrencies for the rest of my life, and I figured... If I could sell my advice so successfully through cryptocurrencies, surely I must be able to sell other advice online?

From here on out, I tried to learn Fundamental Business strategies, enrolling in Business Management at the University of Arkansas to pursue Track & Field concurrently on the side. Economics, Marketing, Accounting, Finance, you name it...
One day, I found myself in an economics class, in which an innocent student whipped out her laptop in class, and in that exact same moment the professor swiftly told her to leave the class furiously, as he had a strict no-electronics policy during his classes. The professor was clearly frustrated. 

So, I asked myself... This human being, with a PhD... All of those years in the educational field... He was obviously so unhappy. All of these entitled professors, unwilling to respond to emails unless you prompt them with "Dr." before hand. Why? Were they really more entitled than the rest of us? What was so special about this guy? 

I'd propose the opposite actually. Taking the standard educational route is the easy path. It's the path that everyone embarks upon because of what their parents have told them. It's available to everyone. It's the safe bet. Everyone receives the same education; the same outdated information that will get everyone the exact same jobs. And we wonder why it's so hard to find a job in the modern day? 

I had just read a book that outlined the average salary of a professor... That number was roughly $73,500. I remember thinking to myself: "So I'm listening to a professor teaching me methodological supply and demand, but yet is only able to reap in $73,500 a year. Surely this wasn't his highest aspiration in life. He always came to class frustrated and unhappy..." 

The problem is that parents always feel a sense of pride when they're able to tell their social circle of Karen and John that their child is now a certified pediatrician with 2 MBAs, 1 PhD, $200,000 in student debt, and 11 years of studying put behind them. On the contrary, they'd hate to tell everyone that their son just dropped out of school in pursuit of "his dreams". Sure, there's plenty of people that have put that reputation to waste. However, for those that know what they want, that is the ONLY route. I had to learn the hard way... By not following your dreams, you end up just delaying or forgetting. There comes a time when you simply cannot juggle between the two anymore. 

It hit me pretty hard when I realized that the resulting of his teaching would allow me to make less than that. All this time in college, only to enter an entry level job to net in an average of $50,000 after 4 years of hard work. And that wasn't just myself, but all 350 students in that lecture hall. We were all just a reflection of what our professors were teaching, and if they could only get themselves up to a mere $73,500 a year doing something that they clearly didn't love, then where would that put me?

Now, I'm not saying that you shouldn't pursue your dreams if you want to be a professor – I'm saying that there is a profitable way to achieve your dreams, and then there is one that gets you into hundreds of thousands of student debt and stress. After all, the most aspired presentations at Ivy League universities are, ironically, by people with no degrees.

It just stopped making sense to me. Sure, I had a full scholarship with everything paid for... But I was actually losing money by not being able to scale my own offer. Surely this wasn't the framework that I was looking for. I loved teaching others myself, but I refused to put myself in the position of any given classical PhD professor. I refused to go through years and years of education, only to be rewarded with a bunch of non-caring students and an average salary.

I already had a decent amount of money saved up from my crypto-currency venture, but I wanted to do more. I wanted to do something that actually had meaning and could switch my position from a stale financial standing point, to an upwards trajectory.

So, I quit doing stimuli drugs to stay ahead in my classes and started investing in personal development and business fundamentals, all the way until I had eventually dried up my assets. I quit studying and did the bare minimum to stay eligible for my scholarship. Everyone around me were quite surprised to say the least. Ever since I started college, I had been a straight A student. I would go above and beyond to not just get 90's, but 100's. It was a turnaround, for sure.

Coaches and peers around me would ask me if everything was alright and were worried beyond measure, but to their defense, I would probably have been too. A straight-A student suddenly dropping down to all C's? They thought that I had given up on everything in life, lol. 

The next thing were the people around me – I naturally started distancing myself apart from them as I grew out of my bad habits. I stopped partying, going out for no reason, attending get-togethers... all in the pursuit of upwards mobility. Yes, I was by myself, but it felt really damn good knowing that I was well on my way towards my goals. I knew that in order for that to happen, I had to get rid of my negative traits. 

With my pre-existing coding skills (which I didn't learn in college), I embarked out to consult and create solutions for different companies throughout my time in higher education. Throughout this period of time, I learned to recognize the eco-system(s) behind successful organizations. Not long after, I started consulting IT departments, manage projects, web-design management, SEO, and coaching.

The art of conducting business had become tangible. It was no longer just mere speculation, it was reiterating and providing a proven framework over and over again for success. It worked. Again and again.

The problem then became that I was doing and advising the same things over and over. I was stuck in a position where I couldn't allow myself to take on more clients, and if there's one thing engineers learn – It's never to repeat themselves. 

Naturally, I tried to find a solution, but in vain. My potential was capped at taking x clients on and I was unable to move from that point.

Until I stumbled upon an amazing new business model – Online Courses.

This model was proposed to me by two good friends of mine (one of which is Stephen, my partner.) I partnered up with them to explore and learn more about the industry, meanwhile scaling an offer to new heights.

As things were escalating, I realized that the nature of the offer that I had stepped into had a Done-For-You vibe to it. This means that students were utterly reliant on us. If we decided to quit from one day to the other, their investment would have been in vain. The infopreneurship aspect that I had fallen in love with wasn't there anymore. The environment shifted over towards having to do everything for the students. 

Meanwhile I don't mind being the reason why other people make money, I want them to do it on their own. I want to create vivid entrepreneurs that can crush reality as it is perceived, not people who have to tag along every single step of the way.

I wanted to teach people how I did it. I wanted to teach others that with a proven process, you can achieve any of your goals. Anyone can gain the financial and time freedom that they've been looking for. Anyone can build something amazing AS LONG as they have a proven framework to put the work into and they stay diligent towards success.

It was at this point in time that I got extremely clear on my ideal client. I wanted to work with motivated/aspiring entrepreneurs. Entrepreneurs that were just like myself, unwilling to give up. I wanted to give them a framework that they could tap into to achieve their dreams. A framework that I, myself, had been looking for, for oh so long.

As my time in the digital world fostered, I became a lot more aware of my surroundings and in what ways the world was headed to. My external world changed immensely as well. 

A byproduct of my new productive habits and focus allowed me to become a 4x All-American and to qualify for the Olympics in Tokyo. The only danish athlete ever to do so in my respective event since the beginning of time.
My college experience was short lived. Not in the sense of physically attending college, but in the sense of not knowing what I wanted to do. Learning blindly without a higher purpose.

To perhaps put things in contrast even further, I've decided to include my story of how a recruiter at Google changed my life furthermore:

After my sophomore year, I had an internship lined up with Google in San Francisco. I was extremely pumped to get to go and to experience more of the corporate world. Being active on computer science hubs, I realized that a lot of the stuff that I was learning was actually pure methodology and not practical for application. I looked up the semester plans and quickly came to the realization that every single thing that was essential to my career in Computer Science wasn’t gonna happen for another 3 years. I thought I was ultimately going to have to bullshit my time at Google, pretending to know stuff. 

My two and a half years in College had given me absolutely nothing that I could show to an employer to appeal to them other than grades.

I wasn’t going to just sit around and learn non-applicational knowledge for 3 years, especially when competitive firms such as Google and Facebook had just announced that they actually prefer self-taught talent. I was so curious as to why these companies preferred self-taught people rather than ones that had gone through the traditional system, proving their worth. 

Now, my internship presented me with the opportunity to speak to a recruiting representative early on. I asked him what the reasoning behind their recruiting policy was–

Here’s the summarized answer that I received:

“Here at Google, we prefer people that are driven to learn and solve problems. We don’t care if you went to college, we care what skills and capabilities you have. If you can prove to us that you're a valuable asset, we will take you in openly.”

I was confused… Extremely confused… But then again, it actually made a lot of sense and helped prove my theory.

You see, anybody can emit to a college and do well with guided problems, tutors and professors. However, when you see a problem in your mind, and you solve it on your own by teaching yourself a new skill (i.e. coding), it demonstrates the diligent mindset that cutting-edge employers are actively looking for.

“If given the choice between two people with the same skill-set, however differing through the level of traditional scholar education… We would pick the one with the least amount of scholar education. The person who seeked out knowledge to solve a problem on his own, and managed to teach himself, is deemed a much more innovative part of the team than someone who simply follows orders from others. We are looking for people with drive!”

Very quickly, I realized that my degree was worth nothing apart from a visual indicator of how well I was able to balance my workload. Despite the contrary belief of what others tell you all the time, that is the truth. Here you have it, straight from one of the biggest corporations in the world.

I realized that college was just a notion of teaching people how to juggle multiple things at once. It taught you time management – your grades alongside extra curricular activities were an accurate representation of how well you did that. 

Employers didn’t care about your 4.0 if all you did was sit in a basement doing homework 18 hours a day, doped on Adderall. Anybody can do that. 

The notion of being the best you possibly can be– Society’s notion that Harvard was the utmost elite environment you could find yourself in had let me down tremendously. And one thing was for certain, I wasn’t about to waste 3 years of my life before learning about something that could get me an entry level position to pay off for the wasted time.

The key thing to take out of my story, if you've read this far (I applause you), is that there was a pattern to my breakthrough success. A pattern that I now actively teach others to abide by, in order to help them to go from not knowing what they want to do at all, to finding their true calling and enjoy waking up every single day.

Step outside of your comfort zone, allow yourself to transcend into an optimized version of yourself. Start today by surrounding yourself with people that will make you rise to the occasion. 

What me and Stephen have created for you all is a result of two highly motivated entrepreneurs combining the best of both worlds into one sustainable way of achieving success in life. It has taken us years of hard work to figure out what works and what doesn't, so that you won't have to.

Thanks for reading my story, I wish you all the best on your journey towards success.

- Kris

Create your online business — Create your legacy.

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Learn to break free

The problem with education today is that most universities and online courses follow an educational system that is static and linear.

Universities and online courses create a mindset that strives to achieve certificates and degrees. These are vague abstractions that don't reflect the reality of success in the real world and gives you a sense of false entitlement. 

Our students don't get certificates or degrees, but rather, they learn how to finally achieve their highest aspirations in life by fusing their passion for success with a scientific framework that allows them to achieve any of their goals in business –– and in life.

    Create your online business –– Create your legacy.